Thursday, September 30, 2010

A Repost From NaturalNews

Eating nuts lowers cholesterol

Thursday, September 30, 2010 by: David Gutierrez, staff writer
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(NaturalNews) Making nuts a regular part of your diet may help lower your cholesterol, according to a study conducted by researchers from Loma Linda University and published in the hives of Internal Medicine

"Increasing consumption of nuts as part of an otherwise prudent diet can be expected to favorably affect blood lipid levels ... and have the potential to lower coronary heart disease risk," the researchers wrote.

The researchers reviewed the results of 25 prior studies that had measured the relationship between nut consumption and blood lipid levels in almost 600 participants. They found that a diet containing an average of 67 grams (2.4 ounces) of nuts per day led to a 7.4 percent drop in cholesterol levels, as well as a significant drop in triglyceride levels. Higher levels of both substances have been linked to a higher risk of heart disease.

The effect was seen in a variety of nut types. The decrease in cholesterol and triglyceride levels was proportional to the increase in nut consumption.

Researchers do not yet understand why nuts, which can be high in saturated fat, may actually lower cholesterol levels. They suspect that some of the plant sterols found in nuts may actually decrease the body's absorption of cholesterol from other foods.

Various health experts warned, however, that nut consumption should be limited to three ounces per day, due to the foods' high fat and calorie content. In addition, consumers should avoid sugary or salty nuts and instead increase their intake of plain nuts.

"Apart from salted peanuts at the pub, nuts in sugary cereals or the traditional Christmas selection, nuts have been largely lacking in our diets in the UK," said Ellen Mason of the British Heart Foundation.

The study was funded by the Almond Board of California, the California Walnut Commission, the International Tree Nut Council and the National Peanut Board. Lead researcher Joan Sabate is also a member of the Pistachio Scientific Advisory Board and has received an honorarium from that institution.

Reposted From NaturalNews

Wednesday, September 29, 2010

A Repost From NaturalNews

Vitamin K helps prevent diabetes

Wednesday, September 29, 2010 by: David Gutierrez, staff writer
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(NaturalNews) People with a higher dietary intake of vitamin K are significantly less likely to develop Type 2 diabetes, according to a study conducted by researchers from University Medical Center Utrecht in the Netherlands and published in the journal Diabetes Care.

Vitamin K, known to play a critical role in blood coagulation, comes in two forms: K1 and K2. Vitamin K1 is found primarily in green leafy vegetables, as well as certain fruits such as kiwifruit and avocado. Vitamin K2 is found in meat, eggs and dairy products, and is also synthesized by the human body. Because the vitamin can be produced by the body and is needed only in small quantities, deficiencies are rare except in those with underlying medical conditions.

In the new study, researchers followed more than 38,000 Dutch adults for more than 10 years, tracking their diet and lifestyle habits and overall health data. At the end of 10 years, they found that participants with the highest vitamin K1 intake were 19 percent less likely to have developed Type 2 diabetes than those with the lowest intake. Likewise, those with the highest vitamin K2 intake were 20 percent less likely to develop the disease than those with the lowest intake.

The U.S. government recommends a daily vitamin K intake (all forms combined) of 12 micrograms for men and 90 micrograms for women. Study participants with the highest intake were consuming between 250 and 360 micrograms per day.

Vitamin K1 appeared to be associated with decreased diabetes risk only at very high doses. In contrast, every 10 microgram increase in vitamin K2 intake led to a decrease in diabetes risk.

The researchers noted that since the study was correlational, they could not show whether vitamin K plays an active role in diabetes prevention or not. They did separate the effects seen from those of age, body weight, exercise and intake of fat, fiber, vitamin C and vitamin E, however.

Reposted From Natural News

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